Author Topic: Stroker 428 with EZ-EFI multiport and hydraulic roller  (Read 15287 times)

Barry_R

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Re: Stroker 428 with EZ-EFI multiport and hydraulic roller
« Reply #8 on: February 15, 2015, 08:23:59 AM »
Good to hear that the engine is running well  :)

I often send these out and never hear from them again - which I suppose is good in itself...

Joe-JDC

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Re: Stroker 428 with EZ-EFI multiport and hydraulic roller
« Reply #7 on: February 14, 2015, 02:03:01 PM »
Thanks for the update.  Hope Bill is OK.  Joe-JDC

c6rodder

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Re: Stroker 428 with EZ-EFI multiport and hydraulic roller
« Reply #6 on: February 12, 2015, 08:38:06 PM »
Has there been any follow-up with Bill on how this package is working on the street for him?  I really did like the concept of the Fast EFI and throttle body with normal ignition system.  Curios.  Joe-JDC

Just a note. I now own the car and engine that Bill Orrick had Barry build the 428 stroker with EZ-EFI multi port for. It is in a 1950 Ford coupe that was once set up for drags with a 4 link coil over rear Mopar differential with a sure grip unit. It previously had a SOHC in it.
I can report that the 428 stroker Barry built performs fantastically. It is street driven everyday, starts and runs perfectly. It feels like it is putting down the full 534 HP it showed on the dyno even after going through a power draining C6 trans and it is a torque monster. It would be easy to get extra HP out of it as it is a mild build but it is too sweet the way it is.

 

Barry_R

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Re: Stroker 428 with EZ-EFI multiport and hydraulic roller
« Reply #5 on: December 26, 2014, 02:59:18 PM »
I think a 450-500HP deal would work OK as long as it ran a "normal" 4bbl style intake

69shakar

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Re: Stroker 428 with EZ-EFI multiport and hydraulic roller
« Reply #4 on: December 26, 2014, 02:25:12 PM »
What do you think would be considered a max build with the ez-efi as Im considering this for my 445 build?

Barry_R

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Re: Stroker 428 with EZ-EFI multiport and hydraulic roller
« Reply #3 on: December 26, 2014, 11:59:40 AM »
Its been quite a while since this was done.  Last I heard it was running very well and he was very happy with the performance.  Since then I have done some other EZ-EFI installations.  I have found that they work OK on mild packages, but when you stray too far from those they don't seem to work out well - had two stack injection style deals that both required swapping to xFI controllers.

Joe-JDC

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Re: Stroker 428 with EZ-EFI multiport and hydraulic roller
« Reply #2 on: December 26, 2014, 08:16:58 AM »
Has there been any follow-up with Bill on how this package is working on the street for him?  I really did like the concept of the Fast EFI and throttle body with normal ignition system.  Curios.  Joe-JDC

Barry_R

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Stroker 428 with EZ-EFI multiport and hydraulic roller
« Reply #1 on: January 21, 2013, 09:31:20 AM »
a nice engine up on the pump towards the end of last week, and finished it up on Saturday.  This is a stroked 428 for Bill Orrick.  He'll be putting this into his street rod, with intentions of driving it all over the countryside, and wanted to have something that would be fun, but still be perfectly reliable.

We settled on a 428, based on a nice "A" scratch block at .030 over and a 4.25 crank for 462 cubes.  A combination of dished pistons and CNC chambers on stage X Edelbrock heads gives us compression of roughly 9.75:1 so it'll run well on any gas he finds.  It has a small hydraulic roller cam - .594/.598 lift and durations at 234/240 on 112 centers.  The last of my Erson roller rockers and a stock replacement oil pan due to clearance concerns rounds out the basic package.  And that is where the cool part begins...

Bill wanted EFI on this engine for both the visual interest and the functional advantages of easy starting and driveability.  We acquired a Victor intake, an aluminum Holley throttle body (tried to avoid the multicolor appearance of various red & blue parts), and a rack of 38 lb injectors.  I initially intended to use the FAST system I had run in the past - with the requisite complicated harness, crank trigger, and multitide of connections, and expected computer programming.  Friday afternoon, with the engine already mounted to the dyno, I stared at the mountain of unbundled wiring, and after talking with Bill about the programming, I decided to try one of the FAST EZ-EFI systems.  They recently released a multiport conversion variation on the system, which is normally sold as a throttle body kit.  One Saturday overnight package delivery later I had it in my hands.  No real risk - after all I still had the normal system on hand if it didn't work...right?

The EZ-EFI system is fuel control only.  It does not have any ignition management functions at all.  We used a normal MSD billet with a curve in it, hooked up in the normal fashion.

Once opened up we looked at the contents and thought - no way - not enough parts, not enough wires, and no laptop computer connection at all.  The harness is as close to plug & play as it could get - connect injectors, and sensors for water & air temp, manifold presure (MAP), throttle position (TPS), oxygen (wideband O2) and idle air control (IAC).  It needs a key on 12 volt source, a full time 12 volt source, a ground, and a tach signal.  The hand held programmer is connected to the harness and to a cigarette lighter receptacle for 12 volts.  Thats it - we were ready to go in fifteen minutes - took longer to read the instructions than it did to hook up.  The next step in the instruction sheet said "start the engine" so we hit the switch and the darn thing fired up in 3-4 turns and settled into an idle.  Damn!  If you listen carefully to the video you'll here me exclaim "that was easy!" sounding like an ad for the kit.

After getting some load on the engine and checking/adjusting timing by rotating the distributor - just like with a carb - we started doing some tuning work.  The system has only three fuel ratio targets you can set: idle, cruise, and WOT.  Each of these are preset at the factory for some safe value.  Obviously the underlying program is far more sophisticated.  You enter some basic engine data into the controller and it generates a simple map for the initial running period.  The system takes the map data and uses the O2 information to "correct" it to reach the target air fuel ratios.  It then "learns" over time, altering the map to reach the target air/fuel ratios with minimal correction percentages.

One thing they do not mention in the instructions is that you need to reach 180 degrees coolant temperature before the system goes into closed loop and starts doing it's thing.  Once working it makes changes in progressively smaller increments - starting with big percentages and getting smaller each time it sees the same input parameters.  Overcorrecting and then reading data and sweeping the other way.  After a little while we realized that the best thing to do was to simply hold the engine at a given RPM and load for a few minutes and let the system learn that point - then move on to another.  It was fascinating to watch mixture sweep back and forth in progressively smaller increments as it homed in on the target. 

Its the same thing we do when mapping the fancy systems - but no laptop.  I imagine that once the actual air fuel ratio is close to the target value, changes to the target would be reflected in performance pretty quickly.  But as it is, this is the first engine that I am unable to tune for peak power at peak RPM by directly changing mixture - because we did not spend enough physical time at 6000 RPM for the computer to adjust.  I'd assume that a drag racer would have to make a dozen passes or so to get clear results.  We did steady state WOT pulls at numerous RPM and got good data and reduced corrections, but the "pucker factor" was a bit too high to try that at 6000....

The punchline is that the system works exactly as advertised.  To say I was doubtful going in would have been an understatement.  In a vehicle installation it will continue to improve as you drive it.  It installs and wires with ease.  It pretty much delivers on every parameter except for hands on incremental tuning flexibility - thats what the more complex FAST system is for.  The EZ-EFI states that its not for nitrous, nor boosted applications.  But if you want EFI on a street cruiser this is definitely worth considering.

As to the engine - should not forget that.  It ran great, and made a peak of 534 horsepower at 5900 RPM.  Torque came in at 540 at 4600 RPM.  It was extremely smooth on both measurements, staying above 500 pounds torque from 3700 through 5500 RPM.  Timing was best at 36 degrees total, a touch higher than others probably due to the modest compression ratio.  The idle was a nice sounding 800, which will doubtless continue improve as the EFI learns more.

Charts, pictures, and a link to the Youtube video are below.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w4DLINEepwo